U.S. POLICE UNDER PRESSURE TO END THEIR RELATIONSHIP WITH ISRAEL | WHAT REALLY HAPPENED


U.S. POLICE UNDER PRESSURE TO END THEIR RELATIONSHIP WITH ISRAEL

When the International Olympic Committee announced that Atlanta would host the 1996 Summer Olympics, security for such a massive event was an immediate concern.

As part of their preparation, local police traveled to Israel to learn about its security and counterterrorism strategies. In May alone, Israel saw a total of 684 “terrorist events,” according to an Israeli government website. By contrast, since 1980, there have been 11 notable terrorist attacks with fatalities on American soil.

Georgia State University criminologist Robert Friedmann — who was raised in Israel and launched the Georgia International Law Enforcement Exchange (GILEE) to help police secure the Atlanta Games — says these exchange programs provide an opportunity for U.S. police to learn counterterrorism prevention and response from a country with significantly more experience.

But critics of these programs, which include human rights groups, view them as a problematic sanctioning of the country’s treatment of Palestinians.

“We think these exchange programs are really harmful. We think they are harmful in lifting up and valorizing Israeli occupation,” says Stefanie Fox, deputy director at the Jewish Voice for Peace (JVP). “We don’t think [U.S.] officials need to be learning tips and techniques from occupying security forces.”

JVP argues that the relationship with Israel has negative consequences for minority groups in the U.S. and will exacerbate mass surveillance, racial profiling and use of force.

Webmaster's Commentary: 

When you approach policing as does the Israeli military and police, suddenly...everyone becomes a Palestinian, and one is thoroughly experiencing the darkest sides of Code Napoleon Law; where everyone is guilty, until proven innocent

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