CALIFORNIA TOWN OKS DESTRUCTION OF POLICE SHOOTING RECORDS DAYS BEFORE THEY COULD BE OBTAINED BY THE PUBLIC | WHAT REALLY HAPPENED


CALIFORNIA TOWN OKS DESTRUCTION OF POLICE SHOOTING RECORDS DAYS BEFORE THEY COULD BE OBTAINED BY THE PUBLIC

California has long protected police officers from accountability. Most police misconduct records are impossible to obtain via public records requests. The restrictions covering these personnel files even prevent defense attorneys and prosecutors from accessing them, allowing cops with lousy track records for telling the truth present testimony as if they've never committed a misdeed or told a lie.

Faced with impending accountability, police departments are readying themselves for mass releases of previously withheld data. Oh, wait. The opposite of that.

Inglewood City Council approved the destruction of records that have been in the police department’s possession — more than 100 cases — longer than required by law. The city staff report and council resolution describing the action makes no mention of the new police transparency law. Instead it says the affected records are “obsolete, occupy valuable space, and are of no further use to the police department.” It added the traditional method of destroying such records is to shred them.

Yes, it's merely a coincidence that records the Inglewood PD has held onto for years -- "longer than required by law" -- are being destroyed days before the new transparency law goes into effect.

Webmaster's Commentary: 

I guess Inglewood PD has one heck of a lot to hide.

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