U.S. INTERSTATE HIGHWAYS NEED OVERHAUL, REQUIRING GOVERNMENT’S COMMITMENT, FUNDING | WHAT REALLY HAPPENED


U.S. INTERSTATE HIGHWAYS NEED OVERHAUL, REQUIRING GOVERNMENT’S COMMITMENT, FUNDING

The future of the U.S. Interstate Highway System is threatened by a persistent and growing backlog of structural and operational deficiencies and by various looming challenges, such as the progress of automated vehicles, developments in electric vehicles, and vulnerabilities due to climate change. Unless a commitment is made to remedy the system’s deficiencies and prepare for these oncoming challenges, there is a real risk that the nation’s interstates will become increasingly unreliable and congested, far more costly to maintain, less safe, incompatible with evolving technology, and vulnerable to the effects of extreme weather, says a new congressionally mandated report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. The report calls for a 20-year “blueprint for action,” which includes creating an “Interstate Highway System Renewal and Modernization Program,” increasing the federal fuel tax to help pay for it, and allowing tolls and per-mile-charges on more interstate routes

Webmaster's Commentary: 

In the state of Hawaii, the costs to keep cars maintained and on the road are an average of $300.00 more than it does on the mainland.

The roads are one set of collapsing asphalt potholes, which are unavoidable in getting from place A to B.

The State ( in its infinite lack of wisdom) signed off on the creation of a Light Rail, the evolution and (at the moment) partial building thereof, is both a financial and logistical nightmare, in which politicians have turned their backs on the voters yet again, and most probably got paid to sign off on the project. As of July of last year, the following headline appeared in the local paper:

Honolulu rail’s price tag now estimated at $8.3 billion, up $100 million

How did the price get so high?!?

The price got this way, because of the County and City of Honolulu allowed contracts to be concluded for bits and pieces of the project, before an actual engineering overview was created, things like the gauge of the tracks, and the amount of weight the rails could support, so replacements had to be ordered. Not having an engineering, top-down approach, which would have answered these questions, and made sure that things were done effectively, has put this project into spinning out of control mode.

So what needs to be done now, which would be a forensic accounting of the funds paid out to everyone at this point; however, the primary contractor, Kewitt, has been been stonewalling on releasing documents for months, so it's anyone's guess as to where the final construction costs will end.

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