WORRISOME NONSTICK CHEMICALS ARE COMMON IN U.S. DRINKING WATER, FEDERAL STUDY SUGGESTS | WHAT REALLY HAPPENED


WORRISOME NONSTICK CHEMICALS ARE COMMON IN U.S. DRINKING WATER, FEDERAL STUDY SUGGESTS

Olga Naidenko, EWG’s senior science adviser, notes that it is unusual for researchers to detect PFAS chemicals in drinking water above the EPA advisory level. And she believes the agency’s existing advisory levels for PFOS and PFOA “are not sufficiently protective.” Communities with high concentrations, she says, should be informed.

The stakes surrounding studies of PFAS prevalence, concentrations, and human health impacts are immense. Stricter standards could force U.S. drinking water suppliers to spend hundreds of billions of dollars to remove the chemicals. And they could require those who used the chemicals—including industrial facilities, fire fighters, and the U.S. military—to pay for cleanups and potentially even damages for people who can show their health was harmed by the substances.

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