Eight Indian fighters took on 24 Pakistani jets in unprecedented dogfight — media | WHAT REALLY HAPPENED


Eight Indian fighters took on 24 Pakistani jets in unprecedented dogfight — media

According to the NDTV broadcaster, the Indian Air Force’s planes prevented the Pakistani fighters from delivering precision strikes against ground targets on India-controlled disputed Kashmir region.

Eight fighter jets of the Indian Air Force took on 24 Pakistani jets in an unprecedented air combat over the India-controlled disputed Kashmir region, India’s NDTV television reported on Thursday.

According to the TV Channel, the Pakistani Air Force strike group included eight F-16s, four Mirage-3 aircraft and four Chinese-made JF-17 "Thunder" fighters. The other aircraft were escort fighters to protect the Pakistan strike formation from any retaliation.

"The large Pakistani attack formation was detected at 9.45 am, when they came within 10 km of the Line of Control," the TV Channel reported.

The Pakistani aircraft were intercepted by eight jets of the Indian Air Force, which included four Sukhoi Su-30MKIs, two upgraded Mirage 2000s and two MiG 21 planes, the TV Channel reported.

The Indian Air Force’s planes prevented the Pakistani fighters from delivering precision strikes against ground targets on the India-controlled territory of the disputed Kashmir region, the TV Channel said.

Webmaster's Commentary: 

I have a companion piece to this I think our WRH readers should see:

New Delhi and Islamabad have long been at loggerheads over the disputed Kashmir, having fought three wars over the territory. The smoldering conflict escalated on Tuesday, when the Indian military launched an airstrike, claiming it bombed out terrorist camps on a Pakistani-controlled area of Kashmir to avenge an earlier suicide blast that had killed 42 paramilitary troopers. Islamabad then announced that it downed two Indian aircraft and captured one pilot. On Wednesday, India in turn claimed that it shot down a Pakistani fighter jet and lost one of its own aircraft while repelling an attack.

RT spoke to Rajiv Sikri, Former Secretary of the Indian Ministry of External Affairs, and Yasir Masood, Pakistani political analyst, about the underlying causes of the conflict and what to expect as it unfolds.

The issue of 'terrorist camps'
The exchange of fire started with India carrying out an airstrike at a remote valley in Pakistan's Khyber Pakhtunkhwa province, claiming it killed "a very large number" of fighters with the Jaish-e-Mohammad (JeM) terrorist group that had assumed responsibility for the suicide bombing.

Sikri called the attack "a preemptive action" based on intelligence gathered by the Indian military. He said India wasn't aiming to foment the conflict with Pakistan, since the strike did not target either military or civilian infrastructure.

READ MORE: Domestic posturing or true escalation? Analyst fears new Kashmir incident prelude to global conflict

"Countering terror is an international obligation of all states," Sikri said. He argued Islamabad is to blame for the flare-up, as it targeted Indian servicemen in response. He accused the Pakistani government of being reluctant to uproot the terrorist group and said India should be allowed to do it on its own.

One thing is clear India will reserve the right to take action against terrorist camps and activities that Pakistan is encouraging

Islamabad and New Dehli, should be working hand in glove, to prevent the existence of any terrorist camps, on either side of the Line of Control.

I think we will know if the fragile cease-fire existing at this moment is going to hold, or be breached with impunity, by the end of the weekend.

And right now, I am praying that the people of both countries, and the Kashmiris, will want a peaceful solution which has the capacity to remain long-term.

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