SPAIN NOT SATISFIED WITH CIA ANSWERS ON EMBASSY BREAK-IN | WHAT REALLY HAPPENED

SPAIN NOT SATISFIED WITH CIA ANSWERS ON EMBASSY BREAK-IN

The cast of characters will be familiar to observers of secret intelligence operations.

The embassy burglars sought information, a la Watergate. Unlike Watergate, they came by day. They invaded the Embassy in a quiet residential neighborhood, assaulted the staff, tied people up, and demanded computers and files.

A BBC report says they were especially interested in former ambassador to Madrid, Kim Hyok-chol, a confidante of Kim Jong-un.

He was a natural target for those seeking intelligence about North Korea’s nuclear program. In February Thae Yong-ho, a former North Korean diplomat who defected to South Korea in 2016, described him as nuclear expert.

“At a very young age, Kim Hyok Chol was placed on the task force that wrote the drafts for North Korea’s nuclear strategy documents at its foreign ministry,” Thae told reporters at a news conference in Seoul.

El Pais on the possible motive for the brazen attack:

Investigators believe that the intruders were looking for “sensitive information regarding North Korea’s nuclear and arms program” just days ahead of the Hanoi summit between North Korean leader Kim Jong-un and US President Donald Trump, which ended abruptly without a deal. Then came this Watergate-style denial from State Department spokesman Robert Palladino last Tuesday:

“the government of the United States had nothing to do” with the break-in.

Shades of Ron Ziegler, the Nixon White House spokesman who dismissed the Watergate break-in as a “third rate burglary.”

Webmaster's Commentary: 

All fingers point to some kind of American intel op, but because everyone got away, the US government is able, of course, to claim "plausible deniability".

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