The first EVER image of a black hole's event horizon: Scientists unveil groundbreaking observations from global virtual telescope that has now 'seen what we thought was unseeable' | WHAT REALLY HAPPENED


The first EVER image of a black hole's event horizon: Scientists unveil groundbreaking observations from global virtual telescope that has now 'seen what we thought was unseeable'

Scientists have lifted the veil on the first images ever captured of a black hole’s event horizon.

In a highly-anticipated string of press conferences held simultaneously around the world on Wednesday, the team behind the Event Horizon Telescope revealed the findings from their first run of observations.

Using a ‘virtual telescope’ built from eight radio observatories positioned at different points on the globe, the international team has spent the last few years probing Sagittarius A*, the supermassive black hole at the heart of the Milky Way, and another target called M87 in the Virgo cluster of galaxies.

While black holes are invisible by nature, the ultra-hot material swirling in their midst forms a ring of light around the perimeter that reveals the mouth of the object itself based on its silhouette. This boundary is known as the event horizon.

'We have seen what we thought was unseeable,' said EHT Director Sheperd Doeleman as he introduced the glowing orange ring that is the object at the center of Messier 87 (M87) – and our first direct look at a black hole.

The breakthrough adds major support for Einstein’s theory of General Relativity and could help to answer longstanding questions on black hole jets, in which the objects occasionally spew out material.

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