Hack-a-Mole! This Is How NASA Hopes to Get a Heat Probe Digging on Mars Again | WHAT REALLY HAPPENED


Hack-a-Mole! This Is How NASA Hopes to Get a Heat Probe Digging on Mars Again

The mole may have hit a rock, or the soil surrounding the heat probe may be slicker than expected, mission team members have said. (The mole needs a certain amount of soil friction to dig; otherwise, it will simply bounce in place.)

But it's tough to tell what's holding the mole up, because its support structure blocks InSight's view of the instrument. So, the mission team plans to use the lander's robotic arm to lift that support structure out of the way.

"Engineers at JPL and DLR have been working hard to assess the problem," Lori Glaze, director of NASA's Planetary Science Division, said in a statement. She was referring to NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, and the German Aerospace Center, whose German acronym is DLR. (JPL manages the InSight mission, and DLR built the mole.)

"Moving the support structure will help them gather more information and try at least one possible solution," Glaze added.

Comments

SHARE THIS ARTICLE WITH YOUR SOCIAL MEDIA