THE TYRANNY OF DRUG LAWS | WHAT REALLY HAPPENED


THE TYRANNY OF DRUG LAWS

SOURCE: THE FUTURE OF FREEDOM FOUNDATION
by Jacob G. Hornberger

The recent drug bust of Russian journalist Ivan Golunov reminds us of another aspect of drug laws — the ability of tyrannical regimes to use such laws to target innocent people. In fact, consider any tyrannical regime in the world — North Korea, China, Vietnam, Cuba, Egypt, Myanmar (Burma), Saudi Arabia, Pakistan, and others. I will guarantee you that every one of them has viciously enforced drug laws. That’s not a coincidence. Tyranny and drug laws go together like bread and butter.

Golunov specializes in investigating and uncovering official corruption. According to the Washington Post, his investigations have uncovered corruption in the office of the Moscow mayor, the funeral business, and elsewhere.

The police said claimed they found 3 grams of mephedrone 5 grams cocaine in Golunov’s backpack and apartment. They charged him with drug possession with intent to sell, which carried a potential jail sentence of 10 years. Golunov denied the charges and claimed that the police had planted the drugs.

Immediately, the pushback began, with journalists and others coming to Golunov’s defense, arguing that he was being framed by the police in an attempt to silence him.

But one can readily see the problem. When the case comes to trial, the prosecutor will ask, “Who are you going to believe — this drug defendant or the police who keep you safe? Why, police would never lie because they have no motive to lie. But this drug defendant clearly would lie in order to save his own skin.”

That’s precisely how the issue is framed in drug prosecutions here in the United States in which the defendant is claiming that the police are framing him. The police or the DEA would never do such a thing, prosecutors argue. This is just a fanciful conspiracy theory to enable the defendant to walk free and continue to destroy society with his drug sales, they tell jurors.

Webmaster's Commentary: 

The drug war is fought because it means money for the cartels; for politicians dirty enough to accept portions of the drug money for their election campaigns; it means money for public and private prisons; it means banks make a huge profit on laundering this money.

It does utterly nothing to assist those people who have wound up addicted, and desperately need to get off the drugs.

What would be an intelligent approach to the problem, is what Portugal did many years ago; they decriminalized the use of drugs for personal use, but got the people on those drugs, to seek counseling. The numbers of users fell dramatically here, and the stats tell the story of a successful government program.

Of course, that will happen in this country... when pigs discover they are aerodynamic.

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