Supreme Court Upholds Double Jeopardy Rule That Might Weaken Reach Of Trump’s Pardons | WHAT REALLY HAPPENED


Supreme Court Upholds Double Jeopardy Rule That Might Weaken Reach Of Trump’s Pardons

The Supreme Court left undisturbed Monday a legal rule that allows state and federal governments to prosecute individuals for the same conduct despite the Constitution’s ban on double jeopardy.

The case was closely watched because of its possible ramifications for President Donald Trump, given continued speculation that he could pardon confidants facing criminal convictions like Paul Manafort. The pardon power authorizes the president to grant clemency for federal crimes, but does not reach state matters.

The Fifth Amendment’s double jeopardy clause prohibits multiple prosecutions for the same offense. An exception to this rule called the separate sovereigns doctrine allows state and federal governments to bring successive prosecutions for the same crime. Monday’s decision leaves the doctrine in place, meaning any person Trump pardons remains exposed to state prosecutions.

Former special counsel Robert Mueller was working with the New York attorney general to build a case against Manafort as of August 2017.

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