Protesters vandalize Xinhua office, public property during night of violence | WHAT REALLY HAPPENED

Protesters vandalize Xinhua office, public property during night of violence

Hong Kong protesters have set fire to metro stations and vandalized buildings, including an office of China’s official news agency Xinhua, during a night of violent protests after Beijing vowed to tighten control over the restive city.

Police fired tear gas and water cannon Saturday as thousands of protesters defied authorities in another unsanctioned march.

Commercial districts on the main island turned into a battlefield as squads of black-clad protesters — many wearing face masks despite a recent ban on them — clashed for hours with riot police.

Webmaster's Commentary: 

The timing on this could possibly be worse for China's President Xi; but I don't know how much. There was a secret meeting of China's government last week China's Top Political Body met in secret, and issued an ominous message to Hong Kong. The article goes on to state:

:Hong Kong has now been a thorn in the Chinese government’s side for more than four months.

Mass protests which began over a controversial China extradition law have grown into more violent demonstrations over fears around Beijing’s tightening grip on the important financial hub.

Until now, the Chinese government has been relatively restrained on the protests, stating their support for the Hong Kong government and their faith in local authorities to resolve the crisis.

But there have been hints of tougher action by Beijing if the demonstrations grew out of control or if they crossed any of the Communist Party’s “bottom lines.”

“Don’t ever misjudge the situation and mistake our restraint for weakness,” Yang Guang, spokesman for mainland China’s Hong Kong and Macao Affairs Office, said in August.

It is almost certain that the situation in Hong Kong was widely discussed behind closed doors in Beijing during the fourth plenum this week but very little of that appears in the final communique.

“Hong Kong and Macao must be governed in strict accordance with the Constitution and the Basic Law, and the long-term prosperity and stability of Hong Kong and Macao should be safeguarded,” the statement said.

It then stated the need to “improve” the legal system and enforcement mechanism in Hong Kong and Macao.

That is likely to be a euphemism for enacting Hong Kong’s hugely controversial Article 23 national security law, according to Willy Lam, an adjunct professor at the Chinese University of Hong Kong and longtime analyst of Chinese politics."

Comments

SHARE THIS ARTICLE WITH YOUR SOCIAL MEDIA