WE STILL DON’T KNOW WHAT GINA HASPEL REALLY KNEW ABOUT THE CIA’S TORTURE PROGRAM | WHAT REALLY HAPPENED

WE STILL DON’T KNOW WHAT GINA HASPEL REALLY KNEW ABOUT THE CIA’S TORTURE PROGRAM

“I was not even read into the interrogation program until it had been up and running for a year,” Haspell told the Committee. But Haspel’s claims raised more than a few eyebrows. For one, the CIA began its torture program in the summer of 2002. By late 2002, Haspel was overseeing waterboarding at a black site detention center in Thailand, one of a number of countries exposed in a 2005 Washington Post report as territories being used for torture by the US to dodge judicial oversight.

Later reporting would reveal that Haspel also played a role in the CIA’s destruction of 92 tapes related to the CIA’s torture program. As such, the idea that the 34-year CIA vet wasn’t fully versed in—if not directly involved in—the program has long strained credulity.

Webmaster's Commentary: 

There were a number of people beside myself, who were singularly disappointed when Haspel was nominated, and confirmed, as head of the CIA.

Back in World War II, there was a German interrogator who was incredibly gifted at what he did; the guy was one Hanns Scharff Bio: Hanns Scharff

Between the two World Wars,, he learned to speak a very excellent English, and was assigned to British and American prisoners of war.

But there was one thing he absolutely never did, and that was torture, or attempt to cause any kind of physical or mental anguish; instead, he made the men he questioned think that he already knew everything there was to know about their operation, and would frequently take them out on day passes for cultural events. And this was the way he got good intelligence from his sessions with the men he was questioning.

After the war, he was so respected by the Americans military, that they invited him to military universities to teach his techniques.

In the confirmation of Haspel as Director of the CIA, it appears that Congress was more comfortable with someone whose concepts of human rights was just to the right of those of Attila the Hun, rather than with a figure like Scharff, if we even had someone like him under consideration at the time.

Additionally, Congress and the military needed someone who could "keep a lid" on earlier, potentially explosive torture/war crimes about which the American public still does not know a lot, but which they knew Haspel understood how to do brilliantly.

History will not judge this country kindly, for its Congressional representatives having made this choice.

First, torture does not get actionable information; it gets the torturers to stop torturing because the tortured has "confessed" to some action about which a narrative can be "spun".

Secondly, torturing shows that we only observe our alleged love of human rights only in their breach; not their observation.

And thirdly, when we torture, we give some third world dictator the absolute carte blanche to start torturing American citizens or military personnel.

If ANY of our readers out there are either in the military, or have family and friends who are, that is a very important consideration against any use of torture by the US.

Scharff's life, and what drove him, at the end of the day, to not hurt his prisoners, when the rest of his contemporaries in the Gestapo were cheerily ripping off fingernails of American and British military, slowly, and inflicting as massive an amount of physiological and psychological pain possible, is the point here.

John Noble, the Australian actor, would be a brilliant choice as Scharff, because he has a gift for creating very complex characters, and yet making them truly real.

But I will tell you one thing; whoever makes this film, and whoever stars in it, will have to be, collectively, very brave; because no matter how brilliant the film, it will probably get completely shunned, as was James Cameron's "Avatar", one of the most powerful anti-war movies ever made, when it came up for the Oscar for Best Picture, and the winner that year was "The Hurt Locker."

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