The Pentagon spent $300 million on defective and missing F-35 parts over the last five years, and lawmakers are furious | WHAT REALLY HAPPENED

The Pentagon spent $300 million on defective and missing F-35 parts over the last five years, and lawmakers are furious

A group of high-ranking Congress members is launching an investigation into Lockheed Martin’s F-35 fighter jet program after being told U.S. military had to spend $300 million in the last five years on defective and missing parts.

The trillion-dollar F-35 program is just getting over many of the problems that plagued its early design and production and has now hit on delivery targets three years in a row and recently announced it had lowered the per-plane cost to $77.9 million.

But an investigation by the Department of Defense’s Inspector General said last year the office overseeing the spare parts program “did not receive ... F\u201135 spare parts in accordance with contract requirements and paid performance incentive fees on the sustainment contracts based on inflated and unverified F\u201135A aircraft availability hours.”

The problem with spare parts will continue to cost the military about $55 million a year, the report said.

Related: The F-35 still has hundreds of problems the Pentagon has no plans on fixing

Now the problems are drawing the attention of U.S. Rep. Carolyn Maloney, the New York Democrat who chairs the House Committee on Oversight and Reform. She sent a letter to Lockheed on Tuesday demanding thousands of documents related to the F-35\u2032s spare parts program.

“The military is spending tens of millions of dollars a year to overcome unresolved issues with the system Lockheed Martin built and maintains to track spare parts for the F-35,” the letter said. “These problems must be resolved quickly as they create a significant administrative burden for military maintenance personnel.”

Webmaster's Commentary: 

This, in my world, is a form of treason on the part of Lockheed-Martin against our military; so why is no one being tried and jailed for the endless rotten litany of this plane's excessive costs and continuing problems?!?

Because, in the legal relationship between provider and the Pentagon, such behaviour is yet not defined as "illegal", when it should be.

Politicians on both sides of the aisle are terrified that by putting teeth into legislation framing the responsibilities of the military industrial contractors, they will lose critical campaign money; in my world, there should be no donations from people in these sectors, because that gives these military contractors carte blanche to deliver shoddy equipment to our military, which doesn't live up to the hype, and may well be obsolete, or damaged, upon delivery.

IF, in every contract between the US military, and members of the military industrial complex, that contract would stipulate that if the products are not produced on-time, and within the first estimated budget, that corporate executives will be personally liable, and potentially subject to jail time if they do not deliver, THAT ... would go a long way toward curing the problem; draconian, yes, but potentially effective.

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