Unrest & turbulence in parts of former Soviet Union mean its collapse has NOT been accomplished | WHAT REALLY HAPPENED

Unrest & turbulence in parts of former Soviet Union mean its collapse has NOT been accomplished

We need to rethink the timescale of political history. 30 years after the collapse of the USSR, it is too early to tell what it meant on a global scale and whether the process has been completed.

Many international commentators are gleefully considering the unrest now engulfing Belarus, Eastern Ukraine, Armenia, Azerbaijan, and Kyrgyzstan as nothing more than challenges to Russia’s (and, personally, Vladimir Putin’s) sphere of influence in the so-called “post-Soviet space.” The UK’s Financial Times declares “Russia’s neighborhood” to be “in flames”; Bloomberg News gloats that “it’s harder and harder for Vladimir Putin to call the shots”in Russia’s “near abroad”; The New York Times proclaims that “Putin, long the sower of instability, is now surrounded by it.”

What these and many other, related analyses have in common is their historical shortsightedness, which has come to dominate our epoch of clickbait news, soundbites, and on-demand mass production of opinions.

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