Honey of a science project | WHAT REALLY HAPPENED

Honey of a science project

It took Kumar seven months to collect honey samples from around the island. She had help from beekeepers Jimmy Trujillo and Doug Gates, who helped her network with other beekeepers to gather samples. She gathered a total of 36 samples.

After getting samples, she sent them to a lab in Honolulu and a lab in Germany.

“We wanted to compare the results that were gathered from two different methods to see if they were similar,” Kumar said.

Both lab tests yielded the same results — the area around Kupua and Kapena had the highest levels of glyphosate.

“It’s concerning because pesticides shouldn’t be in honey, and now beekeepers have to question whether or not their honey is safe to sell,” Trujillo said.

High dosages of glyphosate can cause cancer and miscarriages, according to motherearthnews.com.

The new finding may explain why some bee colonies are dying, Trujillo added.

Comments

SHARE THIS ARTICLE WITH YOUR SOCIAL MEDIA