Chinese troops appear to be operating in Afghanistan, and the Pentagon is OK with it | WHAT REALLY HAPPENED


Chinese troops appear to be operating in Afghanistan, and the Pentagon is OK with it

There is mounting evidence that Chinese ground troops are operating inside Afghanistan, conducting joint counter-terror patrols with Afghan forces along a 50-mile stretch of their shared border and fueling speculation that Beijing is preparing to play a significantly greater role in the country's security once the U.S. and NATO leave.

The full scope of China's involvement remains unclear, and the Pentagon is unwilling to discuss it. “We know that they are there, that they are present,” a Pentagon spokesman said. Yet beyond a subtle acknowledgement, U.S. military officials in Washington and in Kabul would not respond to several detailed questions submitted by Military Times.

This dynamic stands in stark contrast to the two sides' feisty rhetoric over their ongoing dispute in the South China Sea, and to Washington's vocal condemnation of Russian and Iranian activity in Afghanistan. One explanation may be that this quiet arrangement is mutually beneficial.

Webmaster's Commentary: 

With a restive Western Muslim population in Xingiang, the Chinese government doesn't want to see anything remotely looking like outside elements of jihad making it through that 50 mile border with Afghanistan.

So from the Chinese governmental perspective, what they are doing in Afghanistan is perfectly logical.

There is utterly no military metric by which the US and NATO occupation of Afghanistan can be judged as a "success"; rather, these last 16 years have been serial failures, with never enough troops to overwhelm and terminate the Taliban; and now, elements of jihad are sparking new conflicts, and placing even more strain on this occupation.

IF the American government and NATO high command had one shred of horse-sense between them, they would pull all their troops as quickly as was safe, and negotiate with whatever government was left standing in Kabul regarding the pipeline rights and mineral rights; of course, those actions....would be logical.

And please remember the deep history of this sordid war against Afghanistan; the Bush administration was negotiating with the Taliban over the oil pipeline routes, but told the Taliban that their fees were "too high", as reported here:

July 21, 2001: US Official Threatens Possible Military Action Against Taliban by October if Pipeline Is Not PursuedEdit event Niaz Naik. Niaz Naik. [Source: Calcutta Telegraph (left)] Three former American officials, Tom Simons (former US Ambassador to Pakistan), Karl Inderfurth (former Deputy Secretary of State for South Asian Affairs), and Lee Coldren (former State Department expert on South Asia) meet with Pakistani and Russian intelligence officers in a Berlin hotel. [SALON, 8/16/2002] This is the third of a series of back-channel conferences called “brainstorming on Afghanistan.” Taliban representatives sat in on previous meetings, but boycotted this one due to worsening tensions. However, the Pakistani ISI relays information from the meeting to the Taliban. [GUARDIAN, 9/22/2001] At the meeting, Coldren passes on a message from Bush officials. He later says, “I think there was some discussion of the fact that the United States was so disgusted with the Taliban that they might be considering some military action.” [GUARDIAN, 9/26/2001] Accounts vary, but former Pakistani Foreign Secretary Niaz Naik later says he is told by senior American officials at the meeting that military action to overthrow the Taliban in Afghanistan is planned to “take place before the snows started falling in Afghanistan, by the middle of October at the latest.” The goal is to kill or capture both bin Laden and Taliban leader Mullah Omar, topple the Taliban regime, and install a transitional government of moderate Afghans in its place. Uzbekistan and Russia would also participate. Naik also says, “It was doubtful that Washington would drop its plan even if bin Laden were to be surrendered immediately by the Taliban.” [BBC, 9/18/2001] One specific threat made at this meeting is that the Taliban can choose between “carpets of bombs” —an invasion—or “carpets of gold” —the pipeline. [BRISARD AND DASQUIE, 2002, PP. 43] Naik contends that Tom Simons made the “carpets” statement. Simons claims, “It’s possible that a mischievous American participant, after several drinks, may have thought it smart to evoke gold carpets and carpet bombs. Even Americans can’t resist the temptation to be mischievous.” Naik and the other American participants deny that the pipeline was an issue at the meeting

So this was a war over oil pipeline routes and mineral wealth; the late Karl Marx had some very frivolous things to say, but when he made the observation that all wars are, by their very nature, economic, he was bang spot-on.

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