The Philippines: when the police kill children | WHAT REALLY HAPPENED

The Philippines: when the police kill children

After school, Kulot would earn less than a cent and a free meal for hauling buckets of fish for sale around the neighbourhood.

On the weekends, he mixed cement or loaded sand and gravel at nearby building sites, handing over almost all his earnings to his mother.

Neighbours remember him as everyone's favourite errand boy.

Then, in mid-August, Kulot went missing. He was 14 years old.

WATCH: Another child dies in Duterte's war on drugs
Eighteen days later, his body was found 100km from his home, in a creek called Kinamatayang Kabayo (A Horse's Deathplace).

His face was wrapped in plastic and bound with tape.

Police say his body bore signs of torture and at least 26 stab wounds, many inflicted after he died, some so deep they pierced his heart and lungs.

At the time of his death, the Philippines was already reeling from the murders of several teenagers suspected to have been killed as part of the government's war on drugs.

According to a Global Post report, as many as 14,000 people may have been killed as part of President Rodrigo Duterte's drug war since he took office in 2016.

The Duterte administration has disputed these numbers, claiming that 3,451 "drug personalities" were killed during police operations from June 30, 2016, to July 26, 2017.

It describes more than 2,000 other cases as drug-related homicides by unknown assailants, while at least 8,200 other killings remain "under investigation".

Of that number, dozens are believed to be teenagers or children

Webmaster's Commentary: 

My prediction that all the tortures and murders, particularly of children, are going to turn the Philippine people against Duterte, and his anti-drug war is going to simply leave the drug situation worse than it was before.

There is one European country which has had a successful anti-drug program, and that is Portugal.

What happened after Portugal decriminalized drugs, from weed to heroin

The results were stellar, in the general wratcheting down of drug use by Portugal's citizens.

Of course, because it actually worked, other countries, like the US government, are loathe to try it, because too much money, filtering into too many pockets, makes it too lucrative a trade to decriminalize.

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