More Iraqi Protesters Killed, Sistani Says Time for Govt to Meet DemandsSistani aide: No longer can government procrastinate | WHAT REALLY HAPPENED

More Iraqi Protesters Killed, Sistani Says Time for Govt to Meet DemandsSistani aide: No longer can government procrastinate

Iraqi security forces continued to crack down on protests Friday, with security forces killing at least 10 people in Basra, where the protesters have been keeping the country’s main Gulf port closed for days.

Live gunfire and killing protesters hasn’t worked in the past, nor is there any sign it’s going to work here. The biggest issue is likely to be Grand Ayatollah Ali Sistani’s sermon, which is now saying the government must immediately meet demands of protesters.

The top religious leader in Iraq, Sistani has long warned against using force against the protesters, and now says it is time to just meet the demands of the protesters immediately. His aide Sheikh Abdul Mahdi al-Karbalaie, added that their position is that the Iraqi government can not “procrastinate on this issue because of the great risks facing the country.”

Though Sistani rarely takes direct political positions, on those rare occasions he does his word is considered law, and with a number of Iraq’s Shi’ite factions already questioning the government’s policy, this further solidifies that changes have to happen.

Webmaster's Commentary: 

To Iraq's Grand Ayatollah Ali Sistani, I have three words for you, and they are BLESS YOU SIR!!

Speaking out against corruption in government is not an easy task (and trust me, sir, as an American, I do know just a tiny bit about this); I understand that this took a lot of moral courage on your part, but you absolutely did the right thing here.

Because if policy makers in Baghdad do not listen to you, we may well be looking at a bloody revolution in Iraq, with a government permanently aligned with other than American interests, and that influence would most likely coming from...Iran.

Unfortunately, the Iranian-born Shiite Cleric, Muktada Al Sadr, whose party created a significant coalition in the last Parliamentary elections, is now seen as part of the problem, because his influence really did nothing to create a cure for Iraq's corruption, even though he has railed against it frequently.

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