Court orders Dakota Access Pipeline to be shut down for environmental review, handing victory to Sioux tribe & other protesters | WHAT REALLY HAPPENED

Court orders Dakota Access Pipeline to be shut down for environmental review, handing victory to Sioux tribe & other protesters

A legal challenge has at least temporarily achieved what months of protests through a frigid North Dakota winter couldn’t pull off: shutting down a controversial oil pipeline that crosses key bodies of water in the region.

The 570,000 barrels-a-day Dakota Access Pipeline must be idled and drained within 30 days for an environmental assessment that should have been done before the US Army Corps of Engineers granted an easement for the conduit to pass under Lake Oahe, the US District Court for the District of Columbia ruled today. Barring a successful appeal to a higher court, the decision will result in an extended disruption to oil shipments. The Corps of Engineers has said it will take about 13 months to do the required environmental review.

The pipeline has been a lightning rod for controversy, pitting the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe and environmental groups against project developer Energy Transfer Partners and the administration of President Donald Trump. Protesters camped for months on federal lands through the winter of 2016-2017 to block the project’s completion, saying the pipeline would endanger the drinking water sources of the Standing Rock Sioux reservation. Clashes escalated to the point that police reportedly fired tear gas and rubber bullets and soaked advancing protesters with a water cannon in freezing temperatures.

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