COMPUTERS/INTERNET/SECURITY | WHAT REALLY HAPPENED


COMPUTERS/INTERNET/SECURITY

Feb 23 12:59

Scott Adams: Can Humans and Computers Mate and Have Babies?

Read Songs from Distant Earth by Arthur C. Clarke!

Feb 23 11:40

Uzi Nissan Spent 8 Years Fighting The Car Company With His Name. He Nearly Lost Everything To Win

Nissan the car company never really cared who Uzi Nissan was. Then it decided he had something it wanted very much—the website www.nissan.com, which he created for his small retail computer business in 1994—and it sued him for $10 million. When the two Nissans went to war, Uzi Nissan prevailed in the end, but lost almost everything along the way.

If you visit nissan.com expecting a polished presentation of Nissan’s latest lineup, you’re in for quite a shock. What you land in is Uzi Nissan’s corner of the internet; a shrine to the years of his life spent fighting what is now the largest car company on the planet.

You’re greeted with a straight-out-of-the-’90s web design with 3D-effect link buttons, minimal advertising, crossed-out Nissan Motor badges and a Nissan Computer logo design that seems to resemble a stamped business card.

Feb 23 11:35

Walmart is putting even more robots in its stores

For the past three years, the company has been testing shelf-scanning robots in some stores in Arkansas, Pennsylvania and California. The machines, which move up and down aisles, look for out-of-stock items and products that are mislabeled or incorrectly priced. They then flag these issues to store workers.

On Thursday, Walmart (WMT) said it will expand the test to 50 stores. The bots are set to arrive in places like El Paso, Jacksonville and Fort Worth by the end of January.

The company has been careful to pitch the robots as machinery to help staffers, not replace them.

Feb 23 11:34

BREAKING: MAJORITY OF RUSSIAN BOTS PRO-HILLARY, FUNDED BY THE LEFT

Alex Jones breaks down how it has been revealed that the majority of Russian bots crawling throughout the internet were pro-Hillary, and the auto-algorithms were funded by leftist organizations.

Feb 23 10:50

One tweet from Kylie Jenner just cost Snapchat more than $1 billion

Kylie Jenner, who has been with Snapchat since the early days, described the current state of the social network as "so sad".

"Sooo does anyone else not open Snapchat anymore? Or is it just me... ugh this is so sad," Jenner tweeted late on Wednesday (21 February)

From just one tweet, Snap - the parent company of Snapchat - lost 6.1% of its value overnight. That equates to $1.3 billion USD (£930 million), according to Bloomberg.

The news comes the same week it was revealed that Snapchat founder and CEO Evan Spiegel was given a $637 million bonus in 2017.

Feb 23 10:37

RUSSIAN TROLLS ARE FLOODING SOCIAL MEDIA WITH MESSAGES MEANT TO INCREASE TENSIONS IN U.S.

NPR's Mary Louise Kelly speaks with Sen. James Lankford, R-Okla., about how Russian bots are still flooding social media, including fomenting American tension over the Florida school shootings, and what he thinks should be done about it.

The aftermath of a school shooting in Florida, NFL players taking a knee during the national anthem and the 2016 presidential election - these have all been targets of Russian internet trolls. Just hours after that Florida shooting last week, Russian bots got busy on social media posting pro-gun-rights messages, also posting pro-gun-control messages. It's the latest example of a phenomenon documented in special counsel Robert Mueller's indictment released on Friday of Russian trolls and bots working to deepen divisions in U.S. society. Oklahoma Republican Senator James Lankford has been talking about this since the NFL national anthem controversy last fall.

Webmaster's Commentary: 

Oh, really?!?

And by what professional computer training did Senator Lankford come to this determination?

Let us take a look at this man's educational history, from wickipedia.com:

"Lankford was born March 4, 1968, in Dallas, Texas,[6] the son of Linda Joyce (née House) and James Wesley Lankford.[7][8] His mother was an elementary school librarian.[1] His maternal grandparents owned a small dry-cleaning business, his father and paternal grandparents a dairy farm. His stepfather was a career employee of AC Delco, the parts division of General Motors.[9]

His parents divorced when he was four; his mother and older brother and he lived for a time in his grandparents' garage apartment. He became a Christian at eight. His mother remarried when he was twelve, and the family moved to Garland with his stepfather.[1] Lankford attended Lakeview Centennial High School in Garland. While at Lakeview Lankford participated in the Close Up Washington civic education program. He earned a Bachelor of Science degree in Secondary Education (specializing in Speech and History) at University of Texas at Austin in 1990, and a master's degree in Divinity at Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary in 1994."

Sorry, but I do not see one computer-centric class in his education, to enable him to be be able to make the authentic claim that these are "Russian Bots", attempting to "deepen divisions in US society."

Does the man even have the faintest clue about spoofing IPs, to make a computer communication "appear" to be from another country when it absolutely is not?

This is more demonizing of Russia, without a reasonable, trustworthy analysis by someone who understands the tecnology down to the bare metal.

Demonization of another country, coupled with sanctions against it, are usually preludes to war, which is where the US government activity is headed in this case.

And frankly, in preparation for such a war, I woiuld not bet against seeing the draft reinstated in this country.

Feb 23 10:20

America's 4G Network Is Ranked 62nd 'Best' In The World (Behind Macedonia)

The United States takes pride in being a technological leader in the world. Companies such as Apple, Alphabet, IBM, Amazon and Microsoft have shaped our (digital) lives for many years and there is little indication of that changing anytime soon.

But, as Statista's Felix Richter notes, when it comes to IT infrastructure however, the U.S. is lagging behind the world’s best (and many of its not-so-best), be it in terms of home broadband or wireless broadband speeds. According to OpenSignal's latest State of LTE report, the average 4G download speed in the United States was 16.31 Mbps in Q4 2017.

Feb 23 09:25

Hackers stole more Social Security numbers than credit card numbers last year - looting $16.8 billion

Hackers stole more Social Security numbers than credit card numbers last year despite efforts to tame rampant identity fraud, according to a report.

In 2017 the number of people affected by fraud in the US rose eight percent to 16.7 million, with hackers successfully swiping another 1.3 million victims and stealing $16.8 billion from accounts.

Javelin, the firm behind the new report, warned identity theft is happening more online and less in physical communal spaces.

Feb 23 07:26

Mattis: Artificial Intelligence Could Change ‘Fundamental Nature of War’

On his way home after the Munich Security Conference last week, Secretary of Defense Jim Mattis speculated that artificial intelligence could change the “fundamental nature of war.” The security conference gave the impression that no one is truly prepared for that change.

“I’m certainly questioning my original premise that the fundamental nature of war will not change. You’ve got to question that now. I just don’t have the answers yet,” Mattis replied when asked about the impact of A.I.

The famously well-read defense secretary took pains to distinguish between the character of warfare and its fundamental nature. He quoted Carl von Clausewitz to the effect that warfare is a “chameleon” that “changes to adapt to its time, to the technology, to the terrain,” but noted that was a reference to the character of warfare, not its deeper nature.

Feb 23 07:20

'Social media is causing a mental health crisis', says head of  British university hit by seven student suicides

Social media is causing a global mental health crisis among young people, according to the chief of a university hit by suicides among students.

Hugh Brady, vice-chancellor of Bristol, said the pressure to appear ‘perfect’ all the time online was causing anxiety and depression.

He said social media sites such as Facebook and Instagram have become a ‘burden’ for youngsters, who feel they have to pretend to be ‘happy’ all the time.

Seven students at Bristol have killed themselves in less than 18 months – with three doing so within weeks of each other.

Feb 22 11:11

Boston Dynamics teaching its Robots to hunt you

Feb 21 18:35

Nest’s indoor security camera now has Google Assistant built in

Smart home company Nest today announced that a promised Google Assistant update for its Cam IQ security camera has now arrived, which brings Google’s voice-based artificial intelligence platform to the indoor version of the camera.

Feb 21 18:32

Glitch on Bitcoin Exchange Drops Prices to Zero Dollars, User Tries to Make Off With Trillions

A cryptocurrency exchange in Japan reportedly experienced a temporary glitch last week that suddenly offered investors their pick of coins for the low, low price of zero dollars. Several customers took advantage of the opportunity, but one really ran with it.

According to Reuters, it was possible to buy cryptocurrencies for free on the Zaif exchange for about 20 minutes on February 16th.

...

Everything mostly worked out, but there’s still one customer that’s putting up a fight over their heavily-discounted purchase. How much did they try to pull out? According to Japanese outlet Asahi Shimbun, one customer apparently “purchased” 2,200 trillion yen worth of bitcoin and proceeded to try to cash it out. That’s about $20 trillion.

Feb 21 14:47

YOUTUBE REMOVES VIDEO CLAIMING SCHOOL SHOOTING SURVIVOR IS A 'CRISIS ACTOR' AFTER IT TRENDS AT NO. 1

David Hogg, a senior at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, has been outspoken about the proliferation of guns in the United States—and politicians’ inaction on gun control—after seeing 17 of his classmates killed by a school shooter. For speaking up, he’s been targeted by right-wing commentators and outright conspiracy theorists have their knives out for the 17-year-old.

Feb 21 10:47

Conservatives Furious After Twitter Purges Thousands Of Accounts

One month after Project Veritas revealed that Twitter was indeed "shadow banning" and blocking views critical of Hillary Clinton, the social network appears to have done it again, and overnight Twitter appears to have suspended thousands of accounts overnight, infuriating conservatives on the platform.

As Bloomberg reports, prominent conservative pundits and activists said Wednesday that thousands of their followers had been deleted overnight. Other users said they received messages from Twitter asking them to confirm they were real people before being allowed to keep using the service.

“The twitter purge is real,” conservative podcast host Dan Bongino said on Twitter. “Twitter blocked me from twitter ads last night and purged thousands of followers.”

Feb 21 09:09

Coinbase, Worldpay, Visa play blame game after dosh vanishes from crypto-fans' pockets

Refunds for missing bank account cash trickle through

Feb 21 09:06

Rock-a-byte, baby: IoT tot-monitoring camera lets miscreants watch 10,000s of kids online

More than 52,000 internet-connected Mi-Cam baby monitors are broadcasting sound and video to whoever comes looking, researchers have claimed.

These Wi-Fi gizmos, built by Chinese biz MiSafes, stream 720p video and two-way audio in real-time to apps running on parents' smartphones, via Amazon cloud servers. The application connects to an AWS-hosted backend, logs into the user's Mi-Cam account, and accesses video and audio from their linked baby monitor, which is also talking to the cloud backend.

Grownups open their app, log into their account, and keep an eye on their tykes from their Mi-Cam, essentially.

Infosec bods at SEC Consult, working with master's student Mathias Frank at the University of Applied Sciences Technikum Wien in Austria, told The Register on Tuesday they have found six security flaws in the product. The worst of the flaws allows miscreants to spy on video streams of kids without any kind of permission check.

Feb 21 08:24

Facebook Co-Founder: The Digital Economy Is ‘Going to Continue to Destroy’ Jobs in America

Facebook co-Founder Chris Hughes said in a recent interview that the modern digital economy is “going to continue to destroy work” in America.
While speaking about the topic of universal basic income on CNBC, Facebook co-Founder Chris Hughes discussed how the digital economy is affecting the American workforce. Hughes recently published a book titled “Fair Shot: Rethinking Inequality and How We Earn” which suggests that American workers who make less than $50,000 per year should receive a government payment of $500 per month. In order to do this, Hughes suggests taxes on the wealthy be raised by 1 percent.

Feb 21 08:18

Intel's new Spectre fix: Skylake, Kaby Lake, Coffee Lake chips get stable microcode

Intel makes progress on reissuing stable microcode updates against the Spectre attack.

Feb 21 08:18

Cybercrime drains $600 billion a year from the global economy, says report

According to McAfee and the Center for Strategic and International Studies, nearly one percent of global GDP is lost to cybercrime each year.

Webmaster's Commentary: 

The fact that the US Government does nothing about cybercrime puts them at the top of the list of suspects!

Feb 21 07:57

BEX ALERT - North Korea’s Growing Criminal Cyberthreat

The country’s cybercrime efforts are all seemingly state-sponsored and steal money that is then used to fund its cash-strapped government

Webmaster's Commentary: 

The exact same claim could be made about the cash-strapped US government!

Feb 20 19:05

'Slippery slope': Opposition mounts to Canadian media's plan to block piracy websites

Critics fear the plan could lead to rampant internet censorship

Feb 20 18:58

Intruders 'borrowed' Tesla's public cloud for cryptocurrency mining

Tesla isn't immune to the plague of cryptocurrency mining hijacks, it seems. Security researchers at RedLock have reported that intruders gained access to Tesla's Kubernetes console (where it deploys and manages containerized apps) without needing a password, exposing the EV brand's login credentials for Amazon Web Services. From there, the attackers both abused Tesla's cloud resources for cryptojacking and accessed private data held in Amazon's S3 service. The culprits were creative, too.

While many of these mining attempts rely on a public mining pool, the perpetrators here installed mining pool software an d pointed a script to reach an 'unlisted' destination. The move made it harder to simply block the cryptojacking based on internet addresses. The intruders also masked the address of their mining pool server through CloudFlare, and minimized processor use to avoid giving away its presence.

Feb 20 18:52

Billionaire Richard Branson: A.I. is going to eliminate jobs and free cash handouts will be necessary

Billionaire serial entrepreneur Richard Branson says cash handouts will eventually be required to keep people from becoming homeless in the US.

"I think with the coming on of AI and other things there is certainly a danger of income inequality," Branson tells CNN's Christine Romans in a piece published Thursday.

The inequality will be caused by "the amount of jobs [artificial intelligence] is going to take away and so on," Branson says. "There is no question" technology will eliminate jobs, he says.

Feb 20 11:28

The Hypocrisy of The New York Times: America is a Surveillance State

By Derrick Broze

In early February The New York Times ran a piece titled “What It’s Like to Live in a Surveillance State.” The article focuses on the increasingly totalitarian surveillance methods employed by the Chinese Community Party against the indigenous Uighurs in the western region of Xinjiang. However, the Times' piece does not make a single mention of the growing surveillance state currently being installed across the United States...

Feb 20 10:28

Update your iPhone now! Apple finally releases a fix for the devastating 'text bomb' bug that disables messaging apps and causes your handset to crash

Apple users are being urged to update their devices after the firm finally issued a software fix for a new 'text bomb' bug.

The bug, uncovered last week, crashes apps that display a letter from the south Indian language Telugu.

Typing or receiving a message that contains the letter causes messaging apps, such as Whatsapp and Gmail, to crash.

If the symbol appears in a notification, handsets can get stuck in a 'bootloop', endlessly restarting without booting up.

Feb 20 10:22

Lawsuits threaten infosec research — just when we need it most

Steve Ragan, senior staff writer at tech news site CSO, and Dan Goodin, security editor at Ars Technica, were last year named defendants in two separate lawsuits. The cases are different, but they have a common theme: they are being sued by the companies covered in articles they wrote.

Although lawsuits targeting reporters, particularly on the security beat, are rare, legal threats are an occupational hazard that reporters are all too aware of -- from companies threatening to call an editor to demand a correction -- or else -- to a full-blown lawsuit.

But the inevitable aftermath is a "chilling effect." White-hat hackers and security researchers hesitate to report vulnerabilities and weaknesses to technology firms for fear of facing legal retribution.

With nation state attackers targeting elections and critical national security infrastructure on a near-daily basis, security research is needed more than ever.

Feb 20 10:21

Produce suppliers are now using a chemical “freshness preserver technology” on your fruits and vegetables … but is it SAFE?

You may want to reconsider biting into that fresh apple. A GreenMedInfo article sounded the alarm about a cancer-causing, gene-damaging chemical liberally used by suppliers as a “freshness preserver technology” for fruits and vegetable.

Used by the U.S. and more than forty countries, the carcinogenic and genotoxic chemical is made by AgroFresh Solutions, Inc., and it goes by many trade names.

It’s patented as SmartFresh Technology if it’s applied to produce after the harvest. It goes by the name Harvista in apple and pear orchards, and bananas know it as RipeLock.

No matter the name of the product, the active ingredient remains the same. SmartFresh uses 1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP), a synthetic chemical that tricks fruits and vegetables into delaying their ripening by up to a year.

Feb 20 08:20

Flight Simulator add-on nosedives into Chrome's cache

Virtual pilots were excited to download the latest update from Microsoft's Flight Simulator Add-On wrangler, Flight Sim Labs, featuring updates to the Airbus A320 model, but their delight was then tempered with anger.

Users found to their displeasure that as well as a plethora of enhancements, such as improvements to the engine crank and flare mode logic, a password harvester for Chrome had been added to the mix.

Feb 20 08:19

iPhone X 'slump' is real, whisper supply chain moles

Samsung has provided confirmation that iPhone X sales are way below Apple's estimates for the much-hyped, tenth anniversary special. The miscalculation could end up benefitting Android owners.

News that public demand for the £999 phone was falling short of expectations came over the Christmas holidays, with Bloomberg reporting that what was supposed to be an initial order of 50 million units had been reduced to 30 million.

But Apple may have downgraded demand estimates even further. Nikkei now confirms that Samsung, Apple's OLED panel supplier, is cutting production in response to Apple's lower expectations.

"Samsung Display now plans to manufacture organic light-emitting diode panels for 20 million or fewer iPhones at the South Chungcheong site in the January-March quarter. The initial goal was to supply panels for 45 million to 50 million iPhones," the FT owner's Asian biz news service reports.

Feb 20 06:31

Greenwald: A Consensus Emerges: Russia Committed an “Act of War” on Par With Pearl Harbor and 9/11. Should the U.S. Response be Similar?

***
>>>If Russian election meddling is on par with the Pearl Harbor and 9/11 attacks, then should the U.S. response be on par with its response to those attacks? Japan’s attack on Pearl Harbor prompted U.S. involvement in a world war and, ultimately, dropping two nuclear bombs on Japan; 9/11 initiated wars in multiple countries that still, 17 years later, have no end in sight, along with a systematic and still-worsening erosion of basic civil liberties.

This has been a long-standing tactic during the War on Terror of neoconservatives: they love to accuse everyone of being insufficiently “tough” or “aggressive” with whatever country they crave heightened tensions, but they never specify what greater “toughness” is needed>>>

Feb 19 13:22

Judicial Watch: New Documents Reveal More Instances of Classified Information on Hillary Clinton’s Unsecure, Non-‘State.gov’ System

Judicial Watch today released 78 pages of new documents from the U.S. Department of State containing emails of former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton sent and received over her unsecure, non-“state.gov” email system. Three of the email exchanges include classified information. The emails also reveal that Clinton had detailed knowledge about the security issues with in her non-State Department email system.

On March 8, 2011, Hillary Clinton sent classified information regarding Bahrain to Justin Cooper, who reportedly had no security clearance, with instructions to show it to Bill Clinton. Cooper was the Bill Clinton aide, who asked State Department IT specialist Bryan Pagliano to build a server for Mrs. Clinton in early 2009 as she started her new job as Secretary of State.

On August 24, 2010, Clinton emailed Cooper additional classified information to print, including the secretary’s call sheet for Indian Finance Minister Pranab Mukherjee.

Feb 19 12:55

Innovative Engineer Sentenced to Prison for Recycling Old Computers Instead of Trashing Them

Eric Lundgren, an innovative computer engineer, may have to spend 15 months in prison for saving the environment and recycling computers.

Even though Lundgren has a successful computer recycling business, the thought of throwing away or destroying so many PCs was unsettling. So he hatched a plan to copy and sell to refurbishers PCs with Microsoft restore discs. However, when the company learned what he was doing, they tried to put him in prison.

Feb 19 10:44

KIM DOTCOM: “DNC Hack Wasn’t Even A Hack – It Was An Insider With A Memory Stick”

Was Russia actually behind a series of hack attacks that led to a trove of DNC emails landing up in the hands of WikiLeaks? Dotcom, once again, claims the culprit was actually “an insider with a memory stick.”

Feb 19 09:20

Ukrainian cyber-thieves bagged $50mn in bitcoin phishing scam

Security analysts at the US technology corporation Cisco have exposed a bitcoin phishing scam, which involves web resources disguising themselves as one of the world's most popular online wallets, Blockchain.info.

Cisco has been investigating the case over the past six months in partnership with Ukrainian Cyber-police, according to the firm’s security experts Dave Maynor and Jeremiah O'Connor. Nearly $50 million was stolen by Ukrainian hackers over a three-year period through the so-called ‘Coinhoarder’ phishing scam.

Feb 19 09:18

A computer file system shouldn't lose data, right? Tell that to Apple

Apple's recently revised file system, APFS, may lose data under specific circumstances, a maker of macOS backup software is warning.

In a blog post on Thursday, Mike Bombich, creator of Carbon Copy Cloner, says that APFS sparse disk images fail to accurately track available free space, thereby allowing storage operations to continue when space to store the data isn't there.

The failed write operation isn't reported as an error. To the user, the data appears to have been stored, but it isn't. The problem does not affect normal APFS volumes like a macOS device's SSD startup disk; it's specific to APFS sparse disk images.

APFS was introduced for macOS in macOS High Sierra (10.13) last September.

Feb 19 09:18

Soros' Proposal to 'Regulate' Google, Facebook Infuriates Internet Users

George Soros' Guardian op-ed urging the EU to regulate Google and Facebook to reign in the kind of content that helped lead to the election of Donald Trump has sparked an angry response online, with users saying that Soros frightened them more than the internet companies did, or that the billionaire himself should be "regulated in prison."

In his piece, Soros complained that Google and Facebook were engaged in a variety of "nefarious" activities, with their content, for which they bear no responsibility, "interfer[ing] with the functioning of democracy and the integrity of elections."

Soros, known for his open interference, financial and otherwise, in the domestic affairs of countries around the world, complained that the internet companies' products were making people easier to manipulate, and noted that this "played an important role in the 2016 US presidential election."

Feb 19 09:11

Flight Sim Company Embeds Malware to Steal Pirates’ Passwords

Flight sim company FlightSimLabs has found itself in trouble after installing malware onto users' machines as an anti-piracy measure. Code embedded in its A320-X module contained a mechanism for detecting 'pirate' serial numbers distributed on The Pirate Bay, which then triggered a process through which the company stole usernames and passwords from users' web browsers.

Feb 19 09:03

FLASHBACK - Revealed: US spy operation that manipulates social media

The US military is developing software that will let it secretly manipulate social media sites by using fake online personas to influence internet conversations and spread pro-American propaganda.

A Californian corporation has been awarded a contract with United States Central Command (Centcom), which oversees US armed operations in the Middle East and Central Asia, to develop what is described as an "online persona management service" that will allow one US serviceman or woman to control up to 10 separate identities based all over the world.

The project has been likened by web experts to China's attempts to control and restrict free speech on the internet. Critics are likely to complain that it will allow the US military to create a false consensus in online conversations, crowd out unwelcome opinions and smother commentaries or reports that do not correspond with its own objectives.

Feb 19 08:36

Russians Spooked by Nukes-Against-Cyber-Attack Policy

Moscow is showing understandable concern over the lowering of the threshold for employing nuclear weapons to include retaliation for cyber-attacks, a change announced on Feb. 2 in the U.S. Nuclear Posture Review (NPR).

US doctrine on first-use, the NPR cites the efforts of potential adversaries “to design and use cyber weapons” and explains the change as a “hedge” against non-nuclear threats. In response, Russia described the move as an “attempt to shift onto others one’s own responsibility” for the deteriorating security situation.

Moscow’s concern goes beyond rhetoric. Cyber-attacks are notoriously difficult to trace to the actual perpetrator and can be pinned easily on others in what we call “false-flag” operations>>>

Feb 17 15:01

James Damore's Claim Men Have Higher IQs 'Discriminatory,' 'Constituted Sexual Harassment,' Labor Board Rules

The US National Labor Relations Board's Jayme Sophir rejected James Damore's labor complaint because his claims about "men's prevalence at the top of the IQ distribution" and "women's heightened neuroticism" were "discriminatory" and "constituted sexual harassment."

Feb 17 13:21

Hours lost on patching Meltdown and Spectre flaw

Almost one-fifth of large businesses could end up spending up to $50,000 to fix the Meldown and Spectre microprocessor flaw, according to a survey of 514 IT professionals on the Spiceworks community.

Feb 16 19:01

Do Not, I Repeat, Do Not Download Onavo, Facebook’s Vampiric VPN Service

There’s a new menu item in the Facebook app, first reported by TechCrunch on Monday, labeled “Protect.” Clicking it will send you to the App Store and prompt you to download a Virtual Private Network (VPN) service called Onavo. (“Protect” shows up in the iOS app. Gizmodo looked for it on an Android device and didn’t see it—though, presumably it is only a matter of time.)

...

Facebook, however, purchased Onavo from an Israeli firm in 2013 for an entirely different reason, as described in a Wall Street Journal report last summer. The company is actually collecting and analyzing the data of Onavo users. Doing so allows Facebook to monitor the online habits of people outside their use of the Facebook app itself. For instance, this gave the company insight into Snapchat’s dwindling user base, even before the company announced a period of diminished growth last year.

To put it another way, Onavo is corporate spyware.

Feb 16 18:57

Microsoft is distributing security patches through insecure HTTP links

The Microsoft Update Catalog uses insecure HTTP links – not HTTPS links – on the download buttons, so patches you download from the Update Catalog are subject to all of the security problems that dog HTTP links, including man-in-the-middle attacks.

Feb 16 18:51

Hey Microsoft, Stop Installing Apps On My PC Without Asking

I’m getting sick of Windows 10’s auto-installing apps. Apps like Facebook are now showing up out of nowhere, and even displaying notifications begging for me to use them. I didn’t install the Facebook app, I didn’t give it permission to show notifications, and I’ve never even used it. So why is it bugging me?

Windows 10 has always been a little annoying about these apps, but it wasn’t always this bad. Microsoft went from “we pinned a few tiles, but the apps aren’t installed until you click them” to “the apps are now automatically installed on your PC” to “the automatically installed apps are now sending you notifications”. It’s ridiculous.

Feb 16 18:46

Intel facing 32 lawsuits over Meltdown and Spectre CPU security flaws

Intel has revealed today that the company is facing at least 32 lawsuits over the Meltdown and Spectre CPU flaws. “As of February 15, 2018, 30 customer class action lawsuits and two securities class action lawsuits have been filed,” says Intel in an SEC filing today. The customer class action lawsuits are “seeking monetary damages and equitable relief,” while the securities lawsuits “allege that Intel and certain officers violated securities laws by making statements about Intel’s products and internal controls that were revealed to be false or misleading by the disclosure of the security vulnerabilities.”

Intel is also facing action from three shareholders who have each filed shareholder derivative actions that allege certain board members and officers at Intel have failed “to take action in relation to alleged insider trading.” These filings appear to be related to the concerns that have been raised over Intel CEO Brian Krzanich’s stock sales.

Feb 16 16:32

What Is Ethereum In 3 Minutes! Stone Crypto


Published on Feb 16, 2018**Disclaimer** - None of this information in this video is financial advice and should not be taken as financial advice. Merely my thoughts and experiences that I've summed up.

In this video I go over whatis Ethereum in 3 minutes!

Shout out to Wy, from the DigiPulse community Telegram group for putting the below information together.

Feb 16 14:39

#PillarDemo LIVE Meeting - February - 16th Pillar Project


Watch the demo of token wallet as a work in progress. This is our chance to show our community how it's going by giving our first real demo of a working wallet.

https://pillarproject.io/

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