AMERICA HAS ENOUGH URANIUM TO POWER COUNTRY FOR 100 YEARS | WHAT REALLY HAPPENED

AMERICA HAS ENOUGH URANIUM TO POWER COUNTRY FOR 100 YEARS

SOURCE: OIL PRICE
There is a large and growing contingency of pundits, politicians, and constituents in the United States who believe that leaning in to nuclear power is the nation’s best bet at meeting the carbon emissions reduction goals set by the Paris Agreement. Although the Trump administration withdrew from the agreement in June of 2017, polling shows that the majority of United States citizens still want the country to honor its Obama-era commitment to the Paris Agreement to combat global climate change.

Despite 30 years of building next to zero new nuclear reactors, the United States is already the world’s largest producer of nuclear power, generating about 30 percent of nuclear power production globally. There are currently 98 nuclear reactors in the United States alone, and another 450 across the world, but if there is any hope of meeting the clean-energy targets set by the Paris Agreement, it’s not only necessary to phase out coal entirely and significantly increase usage of renewable resources, the United States would need to double its nuclear power production levels.

As Forbes reports: “Since the 1990s, mostly from other countries like Canada and Australia. This is a good thing, as the uranium ores in these countries are much higher grade than ours and requires a lot less mining and refining to get the same amount of energy into the fuel. And, except for Russia, most of these countries are our allies.”

Speaking of Russia, as geopolitical tensions rise between Moscow and Washington, Russian leaders have threatened that they may soon put a stop to uranium exports to the United States as a reaction to U.S. sanctions and tariffs. What’s more, Russian nuclear power is on the rise under Putin, with seven reactors currently under construction, with an average of one large reactor coming online each year through the year 2028. Russia is also testing out a “fast breeder” reactor model that would allow their reactors to be more efficient and create less waste by consuming spent fuel.

Webmaster's Commentary: 

The question which arises, post-Fukushima, is how do we keep these reactors safe, particularly because in the US, much of the nuclear material is harvested for nuclear weapons?!?

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