Pediacide — Vaccine Risks for Kids | WHAT REALLY HAPPENED

Pediacide — Vaccine Risks for Kids

In 1998, a vaccine was released for infants against rotavirus, a contagious virus that causes diarrhea. Albeit unpleasant, this infectious disease is manageable at home with extra fluids. However, soon after the introduction of the vaccine, it was reported that some infants developed intussusception, a type of bowel obstruction particular to infants where the bowel telescopes in on itself, commonly occurring at the intersection of the small and large intestine. While infants may be quite ill, prompt intervention is curative in all but a few cases.

The risk for development of this bowel obstruction following vaccination was 20-30 times higher than what would be expected in a normal population and occurred within two weeks of the administration of the vaccine. The Centers for Disease Control (CDC), in collaboration with the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) as well as local agencies, quickly intervened and halted the usage of this vaccine. Two emergency investigations were instituted showing that the vaccine increased the risk for intussusception by one to two cases among 10,000 infants who received the vaccine. In response, the manufacturer voluntarily withdrew the rotavirus vaccine from usage in 1999.

The CDC claimed that the decision to remove the rotavirus vaccine was due to the fact that intussusception is a serious condition and that the complications from a rotavirus infection in the US can be prevented by oral rehydration. The CDC states:

“…when a vaccine is discovered to have a serious side effect, a recommendation to continue using the vaccine will be reconsidered and the vaccine may be withdrawn, in spite of the beneficial effect of the vaccine to prevent disease.”

Twenty three years later…

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