Military Contractor Claims It's Not Liable in Abu Ghraib Case | WHAT REALLY HAPPENED X-Frame-Options: DENY X-Frame-Options: SAMEORIGIN

Military Contractor Claims It's Not Liable in Abu Ghraib Case

A military contractor being sued for alleged complicity in the torture of inmates at Iraq's Abu Ghraib prison argued Friday that recent Supreme Court cases make clear it can't be held liable for misconduct that occurred overseas, but a judge was skeptical.

CACI, a Virginia-based contractor that supplied interrogators at the infamous prison, is seeking to have the 13-year-old lawsuit dismissed. The most recent legal debate centers on the extent to which U.S. companies can be sued for international conduct.

In recent years, the Supreme Court has restricted corporations' potential liability. Most recently, the high court tossed out a civil suit against a subsidiary of chocolate maker Nestle after it was accused of complicity in child slavery on cocoa farms in Ivory Coast.

John O'Connor, a lawyer for CACI, said at a hearing Friday in U.S. District Court in Alexandria that the high court's ruling in the Nestle case earlier this year compels the CACI lawsuit to be thrown out on similar grounds.

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