Pakistan court gives green light to women's march - with conditions | WHAT REALLY HAPPENED X-Frame-Options: DENY X-Frame-Options: SAMEORIGIN

Pakistan court gives green light to women's march - with conditions

A Pakistani court on Tuesday gave the go-ahead to the country’s largest women’s rights event but told organisers to ensure participants adhere to “decency and moral values”.

The country-wide event, known as Aurat March, using the Urdu word for women, has been attended by tens of thousands over the last two years to mark International Women’s Day on March 8.

A court in Lahore was petitioned last month to place restrictions on the organisers and participants of the march, whom the complainant said had an agenda to “spread anarchy, vulgarity, blasphemy and hatred” against Islam.

The court told organisers to consult local officials to finalise arrangements for the event, which campaigns for reclaiming space for women as well as the LGBT community.

Global watchdogs have expressed concern in recent years over what they see as a growing clampdown on rights campaigns in Pakistan.

“The court remarked that the participants should not ignore decency and moral values while carrying placards and chanting slogans,” the movement’s lawyer Saqib Jilani told Reuters, adding that organisers had been ordered to devise a code of conduct but already had one.

Local police, told to ensure security for the march, submitted a report to the court stating the event faced a threat from radical groups including Pakistani Taliban militants.

The police told the court they would provide security but it was essential for organisers to prohibit participants from engaging in “controversial acts.”

There was uproar in conservative circles over slogans at last year’s event. Some said: “My body, my choice!” “My body is not your battleground!” and “Stop being menstrual phobic!”

Following last year’s event, organisers said they faced a backlash including murder and rape threats.

Webmaster's Commentary: 

The organisers have to see these threats coming, and do their best to counter them, as peacefully and responsibly as is humanly possible. MARCHERS, PLEASE HAVE THE HORSE-SENSE TO PROTECT EACH OTHER HERE!!

As these documented stories go, the level of violence against Pakistani women, is horrific. From Wikipedia, we have the following statistics:

"According to a study carried out in 2009 by Human Rights Watch, it is estimated that between 20 and 30 percent of women in Pakistan have suffered some form of abuse. An estimated 5000 women are killed per year from domestic violence, with thousands of others maimed or disabled."

Violence against Women on the rise in Pakistan

Pakistan to open more than 1,000 new courts to fight violence against women

Addressing violence against women in Pakistan: time to act now

Violence Against Women: The High Price of Women's Honor in Pakistan

As you can see, from the postmark on the last article, this problem goes back a long way.

This is one of the many reasons you would NEVER find me in Islamabad; as an "uppity gal" who peacefully and logically speaks her mind, and as a Christian, I would probably get both assassinated and dismembered in this country, before I got home, most probably arriving back in pieces, as did Adnan Kashoggi.

Comments

SHARE THIS ARTICLE WITH YOUR SOCIAL MEDIA