Was Radical Minnesota Senator Paul Wellstone Murdered to Secure Republican Control of the United States Senate? | WHAT REALLY HAPPENED X-Frame-Options: SAMEORIGIN

Was Radical Minnesota Senator Paul Wellstone Murdered to Secure Republican Control of the United States Senate?

Hailed by The Nation as “the Senator from the Left” and by Mother Jones as “the first 1960s radical elected to the U.S. Senate,” he was killed in a 2002 plane crash just 10 days before a crucial election he was likely to win—a win that would have clinched Democratic control of the Senate by a single vote.

Although officially designated an “accident,” could a new investigation reclassify it as an “assassination,” placing Wellstone in the ever-lengthening line of murdered political figures—from John F. Kennedy and Malcolm X to Martin Luther King, Jr., and Robert F. Kennedy—who threatened the status quo?

In the fall of 2002, in the midst of a heated re-election campaign—and after delivering a strong rebuke to the Iraq War in the Senate chamber two weeks earlier—Minnesota Senator Paul Wellstone (D) was beginning to pull ahead of his Republican opponent, Norm Coleman.

The Democrats at that point only had a slim 50-49 one-seat advantage in the Senate.

But then, on October 25th, Wellstone’s plane went down, and history was changed.

With Wellstone dead, the Democrats convinced Walter Mondale—Jimmy Carter’s Vice President—to come out of retirement at age 74 to run against Coleman, but he lost narrowly.

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