VIRUSES, EPIDEMICS AND EXPERIMENTS: THE HISTORY OF BIOWARFARE | WHAT REALLY HAPPENED

VIRUSES, EPIDEMICS AND EXPERIMENTS: THE HISTORY OF BIOWARFARE

The use of bacteria, viruses and other biological agents as weapons of war has a long and gut-wrenching history. From the Holy Roman Emperor, Frederick Barbarossa, using corpses to poison water wells in 1155 AD, to the Mongols catapulting the dead bodies of plague victims into the besieged city of Caffa in 1346, there are many examples of early, rudimental forms of biological warfare. An infamous use of biological warfare occurred in 1763, when British forces deliberately provided Native Americans with smallpox-contaminated blankets, producing a major outbreak of the disease.

Despite these early examples however, it was not until the 20th century that biological warfare truly became scientifically callous. During the First World War, the German military was a notable practitioner of this art of warfare, although still in a somewhat haphazard manner. Certain operations by Germany aimed at infecting animals and/or the feed of animals in enemy nations with anthrax and glanders (a type of infectious disease). Fast forward a few decades however, and biological warfare had reached new depths in many countries.

What makes all of this worst however is that fact that the US government gave immunity to many of these Japanese biowarfare officers in exchange for getting the data from the Japanese biological warfare programme, meaning that many escaped war crime charges unjustly. This of course is reminiscent of Operation Paperclip, when the US brought 700 scientists from Nazi Germany to America in order to work on scientific projects, including space exploration. In relation to North America itself, one of the earliest biowarfare labs was founded in 1940 under private ownership, with Sir Frederick Banting, winner of the Nobel Prize for co-discovering insulin, playing a prominent role in this facilities establishment.

Webmaster's Commentary: 

Someone, in the scientific community has to have the "male attributes" to resist being tasked with creating such biological weapons.

And we know that the first person in this country to "just say no", to creating such weapons, will be ridiculed, sideline, ostracized, and blacklisted, to the point of never being able to participate in science again, unless some foreign university admires her or his stand so much, and because of it, hires that person to be teaching medical/scientific ethics.

That would take "industrial-strength male attributes" on the part of that university search committee, but when one scientist is able, publicly and successfully to "just say no" to the creation of these diseases, I think that many others would follow.

Creating these diseases is the polar opposite of the intent of the Hippocratic Oath, which exhorts Doctors and scientists to "do no harm", because the purpose of the creation of these diseases, is to create situations where large numbers of people sicken, and die, including innocent babies; children; women; and the medically fragile elderly.

Comments

SHARE THIS ARTICLE WITH YOUR SOCIAL MEDIA